Posts Tagged ‘plan

08
Dec
13

Walker had Issues With his Ex and Daughter, but was Patching Things up, Says Uncle

Paul Walker’s family are in the midst of planning an emotional final goodbye to the Fast and Furious actor a week on from his tragic death, with funeral plans thought to be underway now the autopsy has been completed.

The actor died of “combined effects of “traumatic and thermal injuries” (impact and fire) and his friend of “multiple traumatic injuries” (only impact,) according to autopsy results revealed by the Los Angeles county coroner.

His Cousin told MailOnline he fears Walker’s body was so badly burned family might not be able to have a traditional funeral.

“They have not decided when the funeral will take place, it is still a work in progress,” a friend of Paul and his family told Hollywood Life.

But, Paul touched so many lives before his untimely death,  his family wants all of them to unite and grieve their tragic loss together.

Funeral arrangements for Paul are being handled by the Fast & Furious  star’s on- and off-screen family members.

According to E! , Tyrese Gibson,  is mostly helping the bereaved family in funeral arrangements.

Jasmine Pilchard-Gosnell was pictured for the first time since the tragic crash on Thursday when she returned to his house.

The 23-year-old student  Pilchard-Gosnell dated Walker for seven years and she is being now comforted by her mother, Julie, as she struggles to cope following the “horrible” accident.

“Paul was a really good guy and Jasmine is broken up by this. I went to Thanksgiving with him, played golf with him,” said Jasmine’s uncle, Barton Bruner.

“They had their ups and downs but they were together and looking to spend a bright future together. This is horrible news and unexpected. Her mother is with her and she is comforting her,” added Bruner.

Walker's half sister is comforted at crash site. Walker’s half sister is comforted at crash site. 

15
Feb
09

what will the economic stimulus plan do for you?

Taxes:

The recovery package has tax breaks for families that send a child to college, purchase a new car, buy a first home or make the ones they own more energy efficient.

Millions of workers can expect to see about $13 extra in their weekly paychecks, starting around June, from a new $400 tax credit to be doled out through the rest of the year.

The $1,000 child tax credit would be extended to more low-income families that don’t make enough money to pay income taxes, and poor families with three or more children will get an expanded Earned Income Tax Credit.

Middle-income and wealthy taxpayers will be spared from paying the Alternative Minimum Tax, which was designed 40 years ago to make sure wealthy taxpayers pay at least some tax, but was never indexed for inflation.

First-time homebuyers who purchase their homes before Dec. 1 would be eligible for an $8,000 tax credit, and people who buy new cars before the end of the year can write off the sales taxes.

Homeowners who add energy-efficient windows, furnaces and air conditioners can get a tax credit to cover 30 percent of the costs, up to a total of $1,500. College students — or their parents — are eligible for tax credits of up to $2,500 to help pay tuition and related expenses in 2009 and 2010.

Those receiving unemployment benefits this year wouldn’t pay any federal income taxes on the first $2,400 they receive.

Health Insurance:

Many workers who lose their health insurance when they lose their jobs will find it cheaper to keep that coverage while they look for work. Right now, most people working for medium and large employers can continue their coverage for 18 months under the COBRA program when they lose their job. Under the stimulus package, the government will pick up 65 percent of the total cost of that premium for the first nine months.

The plan offers $87 billion to help states administer Medicaid.

Infrastructure:

Highways repaved for the first time in decades.  And not all economists agree it’s an effective way to add jobs in the long term, or stimulate the economy.

Energy:

Homeowners looking to save energy, makers of solar panels and wind turbines and companies hoping to bring the electric grid into the computer age all stand to reap major benefits.

There’s a 30 percent tax credit of up to $1,500 for the purchase of a highly efficient residential air conditioners, heat pumps or furnaces.

The package includes $20 billion aimed at “green” jobs to make wind turbines, solar panels and improve energy efficiency in schools and federal buildings.

About $11 billion goes to modernize and expand the nation’s electric power grid and $2 billion to spur research into batteries for future electric cars.

Schools:

A main goal of education spending in the stimulus bill is to help keep teachers on the job. However, Nearly 600,000 jobs in elementary and secondary schools could be eliminated by state budget cuts over the next three years.

The stimulus sets up a $54 billion fund to help prevent or restore state budget cuts, of which $39 billion must go toward kindergarten through 12th grade and higher education.

The Education Department will distribute the money as quickly as it can over the next couple of years.

And it adds $25 billion extra to No Child Left Behind and special education programs, which help pay teacher salaries, among other things.

This money may go out much more slowly; states have five years to spend the dollars, and they have a history of spending them slowly. In fact, states don’t spend all the money; they return nearly $100 million to the federal treasury every year.

The stimulus bill also includes more than $4 billion for the Head Start and Early Head Start early education programs and for child care programs. \

National Debt:

One thing about the president’s $790 billion stimulus package is certain: It will increase the federal debt.

Forecasters expect the 2009 deficit — for the budget year that began last Oct 1 — to hit $1.6 trillion including new stimulus and bank-bailout spending.

The national debt — the sum of all annual budget deficits — stands at $10.7 trillion. Or about $36,000 for every man, woman and child in the U.S.

Interest payments alone on the national debt will near $500 billion this year.

This will affect us all directly for years, as well as our children and possibly grandchildren, in higher taxes and probably reduced government services. It will also force continued government borrowing, increasingly from China, Japan, Britain, Saudi Arabia and other foreign creditors.

Environment:

The package includes $9.2 billion for environmental projects at the Interior Department and the Environmental Protection Agency. The money would be used to shutter abandoned mines on public lands, to help local governments protect drinking water supplies, and to erect energy-efficient visitor centers at wildlife refuges and national parks.

The Interior Department estimates that its portion of the work would generate about 100,000 jobs over the next two years.

Police:

The compromise bill doles out more than $3.7 billion for police programs, much of which is set aside for hiring new officers.

Higher Education:

The maximum Pell Grant, which helps the lowest-income students attend college, would increase from $4,731 currently to $5,350 starting July 1 and $5,550 in 2010-2011. That would cover three-quarters of the average cost of a four-year college. An extra 800,000 students, or about 7 million, would now get Pell funding.

The stimulus also increases the tuition tax credit to $2,500 and makes it 40 percent refundable, so families who don’t earn enough to pay income tax could still get up to $1,000 in extra tuition help.

Computer expenses will now be an allowable expense for 529 college savings plans.

The final package cut $6 billion the House wanted to spend to kick-start building projects on college campuses. But parts of the $54 billion state stabilization fund — with $39 billion set aside for education — can be used for modernizing facilities.

There’s also an estimated $15 billion for scientific research, much of which will go to universities. Funding for the National Institutes of Health includes $1.5 billion set aside for university research facilities.

Altogether, the package spends an estimated $32 billion on higher education.

The Poor:

More than 37 million Americans live in poverty, and the vast majority of them are in line for extra help under the giant stimulus package. Millions more could be kept from slipping into poverty by the economic lifeline.

People who get food stamps — 30 million and growing — will get more. People drawing unemployment checks — nearly 5 million and growing — would get an extra $25, and keep those checks coming longer. People who get Supplemental Security Income — 7 million poor Americans who are elderly, blind or disabled — would get one-time extra payments of $250.

Many low-income Americans also are likely to benefit from a trifecta of tax credits: expansions to the existing Child Tax Credit and Earned Income Tax Credit, and a new refundable tax credit for workers. Taken together, the three credits are expected to keep more than 2 million Americans from falling into poverty, including more than 800,000 children, according to the private Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

The package also includes a $3 billion emergency fund to provide temporary assistance to needy families. In addition, cash-strapped states will get an infusion of $87 billion for Medicaid, the government health program for poor people, and that should help them avoid cutting off benefits to the needy.




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